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on the economy. the washington post writes that the white house is ratcheting up pressure to avoid the fiscal cliff. on c-span tonight, we will bring you some of the house and senate debate from august of 2011, when congress passed the budget control act that triggered cuts to take effect on january 1. we will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said w
.7 trillion dollars. now's the time to imagine how we grow the economy, to help feed the economic recovery, and that growth will help reduce the debt. the conversation with the president was about that bigger frame, and how we think about it. and then imagining the suffering that everybody is seeing all across this country, how can we restore the american middle class if we continue to cut programs that support people staying either in the middle class or not falling from it. >> do you believe some form of entitlement reform has to be part of a "grand bargain," a large down payment of paying down the debt? >> i reject the notion of entitlement. i think these are guaranteed social insurance programs of this country committed to our elders and long time ago. we just had a national debate in the country where there were two different visions, one that said, you're on your own, and another that said we are in this together. the way that we think about medicare, medicaid, and social security has to be in the context of whether we're going to create jobs of people can support their families on.
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
the difficult time with the economy, the richest of the rich will have to pay a little bit more to solve the idea of the problems of the country. -- to solve the financial problems of this country. >> good afternoon, everyone. as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the president would be -- seems like our friends on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. i think we have a clear sense of the year to do something important for the country. we all know that the most critical steps to be taken are to save the entitlements, which are on an unsustainable path to bankruptcy. there's no better time to begin to fix that problem than right now. so i would hope our friends on the other side can kind of turn off the campaign and get into a cooperative mode here to reach a conclusion. which leads me to make a further observation about how unfortunate it is that the majority leader has chosen to create an extraordinary controversy here in the senate right here at a time when we ought to be encouraging maximum bi
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
to make a decision and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next el
different elements of our economy deal with d.h.s. with support of others coming up with what would be best business practices and then if those best business practices were adopted by those within that element of the economy, they would get liability protection, liability immunity. now, some say, wait a second. that leads to a slippery slope that the government will come in and crash in on you. i don't know the perfect answer but i can trying for the lightest regulatory approach we could have. and those worried about the federal government coming in heavy-handed are truly concerned about that, they ought to think about this. if we have a successful cyberattack against a part of our critical infrastructure, my fear is that congress and whoever's present at the time will overreact because the public will require it. wouldn't it be better for us to anticipate it? wouldn't it be better for us to get ahead of the crises and then have a means by which we defend against it? we know we're not ever going to be totally 100% successful. so when it happens to diminish the impact on whatever critical i
going to make the economy worse. they just keep pumping more debt in the the economy. host: you are saying go over the fiscal cliff? caller: yes. it is not even enough in my opinion to balance the budget. it is still about three times the average deficit under bush. let us go back to the clinton tax era. eileen anywhere between republican and libertarian. up -- yes i am not. i lean anywhere between republican and a libertarian. host: what do you make of republicans up on capitol hill -- to sort of a back off the tax pledge that he took when he ran for senate, saying he would not raise taxes. caller: if we are going to raise taxes my important thing is raising them on everybody. because if they try to strike a compromise where only the rich get taxed, then it gets more progressive. it is not a point to help the budget. we are right to raise taxes, raise them all the way down to where clinton had them. host: senators lindsey gramm represented peter king, talking publicly abandoning the pledge of democrats will talk seriously about entitlement reforms. rest in peace, grover norquis
by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three years, but at a slow pace. the unemployment rate, which peaked at 10% in the fall of 2009, has since come down 2%, to just below 8%. this is a welcome decline, but it has taken a long time to achieve the progress, and the unemployment level is still well above its level prior to the onset of the recession and the level that our colleagues an
to it happening. there's also a consensus right and left it would be bad for the economy. so i think that when we are just looking at the tax component, there are certain things that we kev knitly -- definitely need to do. patching the a.m.t. for the first year is big. if we don't get a deal on the rest of the tax cuts until early 2013, i don't think that would be the worst thing for the economy. i do believe that it is kind of a little more of a slope. i do think that there is -- i think that the worst part of the fiscal cliff are going to be avoided, and beyond that i think that both sides if they don't come together then we have a lot more revenue, and then we could do something like tax reform on top of that higher revenue, which would still bring in some revenue, yet at the same time satisfy a lot of republican demands for possibly lower rates. again, we can cross that bridge when we get to it. right now i think we won't -- if there is going to be a deal in this lame duck session, we are not going to know until the very end. host: thank you, gentlemen. appreciate your helping us out with thi
-class jobs. it is essential to the growth of our whole economy. on our agenda, a money long list, is our competitors drop world all have strategies. we need an effective game plan to out-produce, out-innovate, out-build, and out-invest our competitors. we must develop plans to increase manufacturing and manufacturing jobs. and infrastructure bank. with me on the podium is the chairman of the policy committee. who will champion the infrastructure which the president mentioned a few minutes ago. we need to facilitate the efficient, private sector investment and infrastructure. we need to compete from broadband systems. with an infrastructure bank, we will be able to out-build a partnership between the public sector and private sector. clean energy. clearly, that is the future. that is the vision we have of an america that has powered itself by clean energy. we need to invest in clean energy to create jobs and make america competitive in the most important, new economic sector. china is doing that. europe is doing that. america must do that. it is doing it as a result of a bill we passed, t
period of lower rates further into the future we are not saying we expect the economy to remain weak until 2015. rather, we expect, as we indicated in our statement, that a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economic recovery strengthens. in other words, we want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increased confidence among households and businesses, thereby providing additional support for economic growth and job creation. the u.s. economy continues to be hampered by the lingering effects of the financial crisis on its productive potential and by a number of headwinds that hindered cyclical adjustment of the economy. the federal reserve is doing its part by providing accommodative monetary policy to promote a stronger economic recovery in the context of price stability. as i said before, while monetary policy can help to support economic recovery, it is by no means a panacea for our economic ills. uncertainties ab
on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they do it, making a point that voters will be looking to see if they can do this in a cooperative manner, whether
. >> it is doing it now with china and japan. you have to of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises the fundamental question and up in in this myth that economics draws people together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?" during the cold war, you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and it two blew up, you could still have 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment in figuring out how to court made, communicate, due to escalation and talk if things got bad. in this era, when i look at the amount of time -- the obama administration more so than the bush administration, when officials meet throughout the region, and the discussion attempt to correlate with china, there seems to be a lot of effort to try to coordinate. jim steinberg was the fourth member of this panel, looking at the island dispute and said, they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication, miss assessment, and the dangers of that between china and japan. it raises the question of whether or not -- i agree. i know china wants respect
, we had huge surpluses because of the strong economy over the 1990's and deficit-reduction plans put in place over the 1990's. the government had the choice to spend that on programs, or returned it to tax payers, and the bush administration decided to return the money to taxpayers. over the following year's tax rates were lower. it was renewed in 2010 in a tax deal between president obama and congressional republicans at a time when the economy was weak and the feeling was they could not take an increase in taxes. host: what was the desired effect and did it happen? he called the desired effect was to give people more of their income back, and that happened, as wealthy people got more income back, more moderate income earners got some back. one of the questions is how it effects economic growth, and it is an unresolved area of economic research. did it did help the economy -- did it help the economy? it is hard to say. we had a good economy in the 2000's before the crisis. now we have a huge crisis. on balance, it probably did not help that much. host: can you calculate if jobs were
. energy is the lifeblood of a thriving economy and society. our future in energy provides the opportunity to significantly assist us in exiting our economic difficulties with jobs and new opportunities in abundance. we need reliable, affordable, and environmentally responsible in terms of supply. i say it is an important day because i believe we find ourselves at a unique point in history at the confluence of urgency and opportunity to them that we should make no mistake about it. -- and opportunity. we should make no mistake about it. if you examine the national intelligence council's global trends 2025 report, you'll find the word "energy" is one of the most repeated factors driving global security over the next 10 to 15 years. this means that achieving well conceived long term objectives depends on visionary action. the defining feature is about being pro-active. not reactive. this demands a sense of urgency and collegiality among the global community them back for the u.s., the united states, it is another critical challenge for our leadership responsibilities the world over. the prop
opportunities of a state. so did the prime minister to drive these over the economy. >> made the offer to the hon. gentleman on would happily share a platform to defend the united kingdom. the invitation got lost in the post and i make the offer again. and we have seen the report a preliminary report before the full report. that is why the office of fair trading has a new power to suspend the consumer credit license. the report shows many companies are not sticking to the guidelines and that is not acceptable. >> my right hon. friend with the study to make sure milton king is the area for economic growth. >> my hon. friend is a spokesman and welcome to me many crimes and has a successful economy. one of the things we need to change is to get the housing market moving again and i am convinced that as part of the recovery. >> many apprenticeds, the youngest only two pounds 60 an hour so the prime minister could take away benefits from young people who simply cannot live -- >> this government supports the growth of the princessships, under this government on the issue of housing. where th
. it is is sapping the ability of the american economy to grow and it is topping -- zapping the ability of the average american to rise. until we look at the major core issues that are making the u.s. more attractive to business, we will go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we can get our economy really moving and growing in the long run, these will just occur over and over again. we identified eight areas, as you mentioned, where we find there is broad consensus where we believe these things would really move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two, three, four years. there is some real bipartisan support. the first is the need of a sustainable budget compromise. that is widely accepted by all. two, easing on highly skilled immigration now. yes, when a broader immigration reform, but this is one of the abilities to really move rapidly to inject skills and to the economy and fill jobs badly need to be filled to sustain our growth. it is not a long-term solution and there, but it is a critical step we can take now that would really move the needle. we hav
comprehensive immigration reform. he sees it as a key part to stabilizing the economy, investing in the middle class, not having a subclass of 11 million people that hurt economic revitalization. for him i think it is a piece of the middle class agenda. >> are the other unions working with senator schuman who say they are starting to work on a piece of legislation? >> the majority leader and center schumer. we have some issues with this idea, but we applaud his enthusiasm. we are trying to get him on the steps of key elements that are important to us. >> where do you disagree? >> i think he thinks a national id card is required. we do nothing that needs to be part of the solution to fixing the broken immigration system. >> washington journal continues. host:jim martin n. he will be talking about the future of health care, especially the elements of the affordable care act that are put to place. guest: glad to be here. host: what does it mean in general for older americans now that the election is over? guest: i think things like obamacare, the affordable care act, seniors were opposed to it b
to raise taxes on small businesses because it would damage the economy. now he thinks this economy is stronger than it was two years ago and we are in better shape to take the economic hit. it is an interesting question. if you go over the tax cliff and taxes are raised dramatically, the house would have our past -- will already have passed. on the sequester, i thought if republicans won the house and senate of the president say, since it -- sequestration would not happen. it denied give up any of the savings from the sequestered . but did so by impacted the pentagon less heavily than the sequestered it. but divided government, i think you get the question. president said he does not want to change the money for the pentagon. mitch mcconnell said we are not raising taxes to ransom the pentagon budget cuts. a lot of focus has been on the pentagon but these are more concerned about the $50 billion in domestic discretionary spending restraint every year. you did to the republican study committee. the announced all a thing worse than sequestration would not be having savings. this stam
in and complete college represent a barrier that i believe will ultimately injured our economy. not only that, but a rapid change in technological revolutions has created a spatial mismatch between the kinds of jobs that are going to be available going forward and the kinds of people who are able to take those jobs. that problem is most acutely seen in urban communities, which have been coming to your point, dealing with more basic concerns more so than trying to prepare and get ready and respond to changes in going forward. that is for those who are actually going to college and graduated. we have not even talked about those who are not. our young people are following what is going on. they are seen with their older friends are dealing with an understandably wonder about their prospects. we have to play -- pay close attention to that. i am a high art educator and i teach in a public university system. in the state where i teach, virginia, you see a number of state legislative budget cuts for colleges and universities throughout the commonwealth. a virginia is one of 8 states that have cut at
.7%, the highest since july, 2007 and 60.8% in october, 2011. what does it mean for our economy? guest: sometimes there is a direct correlation between what we see in terms of how consumers feel about the economy and what they are willing to spend in terms of the holidays and in general. what we are seeing now especially when you look at the university of michigan reported that the optimism about progress in the job market is offsetting a lot of concern about the fiscal cliff and the possibility of tax increases and cuts to government spending. host: when you look at consumer confidence and sentiment, what factors are in play? guest: a lot of times it has to do with how they feel about their own personal fan -- finances and how they feel about the job market and the prospects of finding employment or losing employment. there is a lot of concern still about the high unemployment levels but the idea that the housing market is improving and the idea that there are a lot more employers that are willing to slowly higher at this point seems to be reassuring consumers that there is some hope for the eco
this difficult time we have had with the economy. the richest of the rich will have to pay a little bit more to solve the financial problems we have in this country. [inaudible] >> right after the senate majority leader harry reid spoke, republican leaders held their own briefing and ways to find a deal and criticized leader reid's plan. this is 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the president would be -- seems like our friends on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. i think we have a clear sense and opportunity here at the end of the year to do something important for the country. we all know that the most critical steps to be taken are to save the entitlements, which are on an unsustainable path to bankruptcy. there's no better time to begin to fix that problem than right now. so i would hope our friends on the other side can kind of turn off the campaign and get into a cooperative mode here to reach a conclusion. which leads me to make a further observa
of our abilities to inject new skills into the economy to build jobs that need to be built in america to sustain our growth. it is critical step that we can take now. we have got to realign the corporate tax code. everyone agrees. we just did a survey that includes members of the general public. 70% of the general public believes we need to simplify. we cannot have the tax code that has higher rates and more complexity than anywhere else in the world. we have got to address the system that really hurts- innovation and high technology economy. we did not worry about those when we were doing well, but they are getting in the way of progress we have got to go through the process in a simpler and more logical and efficient way. this is the number one thing thousands of business people said was the biggest barrier to investing in the u.s. we have got to upgrade our infrastructure, but we have got to focus on those that are economically important. we have got to understand the things that are driving up the cost of doing business. we know what those are, but we need a plan for going forward
. caller: i have an idea for straightening out things are going on with the economy and some -- everything else. we have to separate our federal employees -- state, federal, and local -- and our health care workers from the private sector. if we do this, we can concentrate on mortgages for 6% interest for all the federal and -- and some health care workers. in 30 years we would have $24 trillion. 45 million, 54 trillion -- host: where are you getting the numbers from? caller: because, if we take the war that we have now, $104 billion, and we put it into mortgages at 6% interest rate they would come out to 70 -- $17,000 a year. 20 million employees. which means they would be self sufficient for the rest of their lives, which means you would have 166,000 per employee in interest that would cover the employee you got this -- that is working, the employee does is retired, and his benefits. which would cut down the deficit, cut down just about everything you could think of perry taxes in half, property taxes would be cut. you would have a whole new system. guest: there are certainly a whole ran
, they spent a lot of time thinking about the future. so in the next four years who can i trust on the economy, on social issues and foreign policy. and we live in a country that is even pli divided politically and we have close elections. our victory in 2008 was a landslide. it was clear this election was going to be closer, fwiven the economy and divisions in the country. with that being said, we still won electoral college, maybe not a landslide but a clear majority. our popular vote is 3% which is a healthy margin. and i think the reason we won is people understood where we had been economically. all of you have lived through the recession. this is not something that is an academic theory. everyone painfully lived through the recession. we are beginning to recover from that. the economy has created jobs over 5 fnt 5 million jobs which our economy is far too week but the electorate said i'm beginning to feel some progress. does that mean i'm satisfied? of course not. but i'm beginning to feel some progress and i think people thought it was a risk to go back and try economic policies that le
about the economy. >> when does this end? >> we have a plan. we are working on it. >> is getting worse. >> the people on top chose to look away. >> if the transactions are so useful, how come they brought down the financial system? >> my parents fight about money. >> i told my wife, this is not america. it is full of wonderful people. we will see if they can help us. >> it is tough on us. >> i will ask personal questions. do you smoke? curse? >> it is a question that has to be answered. >> you are very friendly. >> what is wrong with you? >> i do get it. >> you are simpletons. >> i ask you a simple question. >> did you think you would get away with that? >> that is an excellent question. >> you are you? >> how many times have you been indicted? >> do you have any friends? >> you have got it wrong. >> how does that make sense? >> what do you think is going on here. >> i am gay and jewish. >> what kind of republican are you? >> afghanistan. >> health care bill. >> the unemployment problem. >> we have got a lot more work to do. >> why is it taking so long? >> when we flew over this, i sai
class. "we need to make the investments that will help the economy grow for years into the future. although that is achievable. with a little give, we can get it done. >> with new say a deal is best achieved by the end of the year, does that rule out the president agreeing to kicking it over into next year? i was asked if he supports the it -- what did you call them? the fiscal cliff divers? it is our belief in president's belief as being spelled out in the plant today, it would rain damage being done to the economy if we do not extend tax cuts for the middle-class and address the other elements of the fiscal cliff and, more broadly speaking, address our long term fiscal challenges and how the economy creates jobs. we need to get this done and that is what we're working on. >> one more? >> olivier, alexis, april. >> you have said repeatedly "we" have expressed concerns? >> i would refer to the state department. >> were you for warrant that mr. mursi was going to do this? -- were you forewarned mr. morsi was going to do this? >> these are separate issues. we have raised our concern
, but we have been around the south to understand -- th would be a great driver for our economy. we are over performing the rest of the world right now. if we can actually -- for the business community and the american people say we have our fiscal house in order for a 20 period and will still be able to invest in education and technology and rearch -- this will create the conditns for our growth to be stronger. this is going to get harry. these are big stakes -- the debt ceiling is concern to everyone. it is more amorphous for the average person -- this means if congress does not act, everybody in the country will pay more taxes. think about that -- $2,000 of the pockets of most americans, what that will do to consumption, confidence and small businesses -- this could not be more serious. i remain confident because t stakes are so high. we have a firm deadline. we wilmake some progress. i think what we need to do -- let's go for the big deal, let's go for something that we can say for a 10-20 year period, our country is on the way to sustainable fiscal path. the on the way it gets
with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy and society of egypt not having conflict on his borders, so i think we should give him the space and time to accomplish those things. >> mr. david winnig. >> i'm goingo try to justify rocket firing into israel, but does the foreign secretary also recognize that the way in which airstrikes, israeli airstrikes are caused so much civilian casualties in gaza that in some respects the killing of children, the burning to death of children mu be considered a war crime? and as far as the overall position is concerned, mr. speaker, isn't the truth of the matter that since the fate of israel was created in 1948, the israeli authorities -- even more so sincehe 1967 war -- have refused to recogni the legitimacy of the palestinian people for statehood, for a proper life in and that is really the real issue facing the international community at the moment. >> well, there have been failings on all sides, and i don't want to agree with everything the honorable gentleman just said. he's heard me at dispatch box before criticize the israeli a
. the president promised transparency. the republicans promised certain wisdom when it comes to the economy. unfortunately, and it has not just been this term or last term. this has been going on for a number of years which i think speaks to why we need term limits. host: a few more of the poll results from gallup and "usa today." the dark blue is from 2008, the light blue is from 2012. bring troops home from afghanistan. improve conditions for minorities and the poor. improved education. keep the u.s. safe from terrorism. the quality of the environment. reduce unemployment dropped from 67% to 56%. improve the health care system dropped from 64% to 55%. to go over to the budget, substantially reduce the budget deficit. 42% thought the obama administration would be able to do that in 2008. avoid raising taxes. control illegal immigration. heal political divisions in this country. 54% thought so in 2008. bob in north carolina on are democrats' line. you are up next. caller: i just think it is going to be better coming up this next time because i believe obama it did need a second chance. i vo
building the economy again. -- no matter what the grover norquist or lindsey graham or any of them say, every republican in the house should vote to raise taxes on the rich. the average republican is not making $250,000 a year. they're just saying they should not raise taxes because they are republicans. host: are you a republican? caller: i am, but i voted for obama. host: what would it take for you to vote for republican? in terms of the fiscal cliff, sequestration, big budget cuts, what do you want to see them do? caller: if the republicans could find a candidate that would do what ronald reagan dipped, they would gladly get my vote back. as long as they have people like john mccain, sarah palin, and mitt romney, they are just playing. host: here's a story in the new --k times . david is up next, new york, good morning. caller: good morning. how are ya? i'm a republican and i don't believe that the 1% or a portion of the country should be taxed. it can be mathematically proven. a president handed in m speech to be scored. he never came up with a plan how this money would be redistr
come to a close. to many americans are out of work. our national debt exceeds the size of the economy and threatens to derail our children's future. as a mother, this is a constant worry. yet today we will honor the thanksgiving tradition with wishes of peace and grace. we will pray for those less fortunate. we will think of service members away from home and give thanks for them and their families. our hearts will go out to the families without power after hurricane sandy. we will look ahead to the holidays and a new year. that same spirit of optimism that brings us together today should inspire us all year round. that is why here, in washington, d.c., republicans have reached out to president obama in the hope of working together to help our economy grow and solve the debt that threatens our children's future. the clock is ticking. one month from now, unless congress and the president take action, the current tax rates will would expire and we will experience the largest tax increase in u.s. history. amid so much economic suffering, raising taxes would have a devastating impact on o
for the overall economy, but the impact on women and children and some of our most vulnerable would be devastating, and that's why your particular focus today in special order is so important. the united states currently ranks about 50th in the world in infant mortality. and morocco, 1.8 infants under one year of age, they die for every 1,000 live births each year. in japan the number is 2.2. in the united states, to our shame, the number is six. from new zealand to all other advanced countries around the world, they do much better than the united states in this most fundamental measure of health and well-being. and the people who are most affected by this failure are not those who have been irresponsible, they are not slackers, they are not lazy, they are babies. they are babies. mostly babies who have been born into poverty. this is a metric that we should feel morally bound to improve by leaps and bounds. but instead we are about to make it worse for these babies. if we don't act, and if we don't act swiftly to prevent sequestration. if this congress does not act to prevent this country from pl
$2.30 trillion of our gross domestic product, money we could have added to this economy. we are now in a place where we are playing catch-up with countries that used to crave to be like us. it is so bad now that while our university systems are still where they should be in terms of reputation and attainment, no one from other countries want to send their kids over here to our k-12 schools. they do that there and then it they will say, will try some ivy league school. we need to seriously look at, what is it going to take to change that dynamic. in recent days, we have heard about the teachers' strike. i think that the big challenge we have, if we put ourselves in these partisan boxes and we force people when we talk about education to take sides -- the side that is never adequately represented in these discussions is kids. i just posted on my blog, i said, okay, how will it teachers' strike in chicago help kids? i got all these responses from people who love teachers, people who are mad at teachers. i had 40 people just immediately respond. no one answered that question. they start
for the fiscal future but also for the fact that our economy needs to get going. beginning to take steps to fixing the fiscal problems, the people we expect to reinvest in our economy are doing a great job. >> we had a president asking us for a blank check and he did not get this. and a big increase on job creators. we got the -- we got that. and we have been trying to get discretionary spending caps in loss since i have been here for 13 years. we have been introducing legislation for the last eight years to get caps on spending. we could not get this the last time the republicans were in the majority. we see this as a good step in the right direction. every cent down payment in the deficit and a huge change in the culture of spending. you are spending less money on this this year than last year. we have a long ways to go. we really do believe that the value of this republican majority will change this culture. we had the gephardt rule. no one would have to be seen voting for the budget resolution. we would do this in plain sight. >> the debate was long and it was not easy. and they have
have on the economy and consumer spending. increased taxes could cut consumer spending spite $200 billion. -- consumer spending by $200 billion. what it can take all negotiations over the sequestered, we are focusing and the beginnings of the debate on the national debt in prime time. we will go back to august of last year to review some of the debate and news conferences from congress and the white house surrounding the passage of the budget control act. the law created automatic spending cuts set to take effect in january along with expiring tax provisions, part of the so- called fiscal cliff. that is tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span. congress returns from a week long thanksgiving break this week. the house is back tomorrow to debate a number of bills. a major bill comes up on thursday when they will consider a visa program for students getting advanced degrees and computer science, engineering and mathematics. off the floor, democrats plan to let new leadership. that is scheduled for thursday. you can see the house tomorrow on c-span. the senate is back today at 2:00 eastern.
for the demands of the -- training that they need for the modern economy? >> it is available. we can do better. we can structure some of those programs better so that individuals who stars school have the support mechanisms to finish an associate's degree or bachelor's degree if that is their goal. we can do better at that. there are well intentioned programs that are not quite efficient or effective as i hope there will be in the future. >> at the wharton school of business and the university of iowa -- it offers in-state tuition for returning veterans. what is the impact on the present -- campus? the president said we have 200 of them. they have lifted the entire campus. as someone who went through the university of iowa -- i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership. we do not have to go do that again. [laughter] that is value added when these young men and women come back and into an academic or training program of some kind. >> i could not agree more. at the city college of new york, we had a specific program at the powell center that i am happy to have named after me. we take in
of the modern economy? >> it is available. we can do better with it. they are facts like completion rates for the gi bill education are not as high as they ought to be. we can structure some of those programs better so that individuals who start school have the support mechanisms to finish an associate's degree or bachelor's degree if that is their goal. we can do better at that. there are well-intentioned programs that are not quite efficient or effective to this point as i hope there will be in the future. >> the university of iowa offers in-state tuition for returning veterans. i said to the president -- what is the impact on the campus? she said -- beyond my ability to describe it -- we have 200 of them here. they lifted the entire campus. as someone who went to the university of iowa -- i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership at one point. we do not have to go do that again. paul, we talked about that. [laughter] that is value added when these young men and women come back and enter an academic or training program of some kind. >> i could not agree more. at my alma ma
. neural the ship and its impact on the u. s economy. friday morning, a discussion on the potential impact of fiscal cliff budget cuts on the federal work force. the future of the postal service, which has lost $16 billion in 2012. and a look at some point -- consumer confidence with danielle douglas. >> you've career officers change this army because it becomes a volunteer army. go find them in the villages and towns of america. we did that, and over five or six years we created a splendid force of young men and women who are willing to serve their country as volunteers, and they have the same tradition, culture, loyalty and dedication as any other generation of americans that have ever gone before. they proved themselves in the gulf war, the panama invasion, in the last 10 years in iraq and afghanistan. but the thing we have to keep in mind is something that president lincoln said in his second inaugural address -- care for those who have borne the battle, to care. that means never forget they are carrying the american spirit, the american traditions with them, and when they get injured,
amounts of money back into the economy. the energy picture looks a lot different than it did a few years ago. host: this natural gas boom that we have, why do you say we are in danger of blowing it? guest: there was a large amount of investment made in recent years to extract that gas. we are looking at different ways of using it. both the price and supply in the long term may be more constrained. guest: -- host: you also argue the problem of the aging energy trend. guest: is the transition to gas. this year a large portion of the energy produced in the united states, almost 50% is going to be produced by natural gas. a big change. a long-term evolution that we have been going through. coal-fired plants have been taken off line this year in record numbers. that has been made up by more utilization of existing natural gas plants. that is a good thing for the grid, it creates a lot of flexibility. the challenge that we have, as anyone living in the eastern part of the united states has recognized, is that the grid itself is very susceptible to storms and other kinds of power interruptions
and others, are they getting the kind of training they need in this economy? >> i think it's available. i think we can do better with it. there are some facts like completion rates for gi bill education are not as high as they ought to be. i think we can structure some of those programs a little better so individuals who start school have the kind of support mechanisms to be built to finish either an associate's degree or bachelor's degree, if that is their goal. but we can do better at that. there are well-intentioned programs that are not quite as efficient or effective at this point. >> the wharton school of business and the university of iowa, the university of iowa offers in-state tuition to returning veterans. i ask the president what's the impact on the campus? he said beyond my ability to describe. i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership at one. -- one point as a graduate of iowa. when these young and women come back and enter an academic or training program of some kind, we need this. >> i cannot agree more. city college of new york, mike alma mater, we had a spec
our economy. also this afternoon, senior staff, including jack lou, valerie jarrett, secretary geithner will meet with leaders of fix the debt, including maya mcginnis anders kin bowles. tomorrow he will have an event with middle class americans again to talk about and highlight the importance of extending tax cuts to the middle class, to 98% of american taxpayers and 97% of small businesses. this is vital, it is something that everyone in washington agrees must be done. and it is something that the house of representatives could do today. or tomorrow. if they so chose. because the senate has already passed a bill that extends those tax cuts, if the house were to pass them, the president would sign it right away and that would create certainty for 98% of american taxpayers, middle class families around the country, 97% of america's small businesses, and would go a long way, or significant way toward dealing with the so-called fiscal cliff. also tomorrow, the president has another meeting with business leaders following the one he had prior to the thanksgiving holiday. so -- fri
with the bad for the economy and would be a source of social conflict. so we created a vast policy innovation called the g.i. bill. i think we need something that is an encore bill to help tens of millions who are crossing different terrain. it's not geographic. it's not from military service disability and life but it's really a stage in life that has no name, that has few pathways and institutions, but in the same way that we are deeply invested in those soldiers finding their footing. the same is true of all these millions and millions of people today who are in this period that is between life resembling retirement and old age. i would like to see us do it in a way that promotes social mobility. this wonderful example, the troops and teachers program which helps, to go back to the g.i. bill analogy, would help mostly sergeants coming back from the gulf war, moving the ball for school teaching. it was created by an 86-year-old retired history professor at washington university who watched a youth account of soldiers coming back from the first iraq war who were having trouble getting their
for success as the economy is recovering. the gap between rich and poor in this country has never been greater. we need to find ways to create more balanced. we are fighting to say, less than have -- let's go back to the tax rate we had in the clinton era. when you are talking about marginal tax rates for those who are making above $250,000 -- the bottom line in california is not about pensions. california has passed do revenue from the recent election to try to get money back into schools. you are right that in a public education system, parents should not be asked to subsidize each and every day. that is what is happening in lots of places. i have seen across the country how parents are being axed. it would be better -- i have seen across the country how parents are being asked. there has to be transparency and there has to be accountability in terms of what the money is used for. thes go in and looked at well-rounded education kids have in private schools. in public schools, if kids have special needs, we have to pay more for education for kids with special needs. host: randi weingarten is
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